“Nevertheless, She Persisted”


I first heard of Elizabeth Warren during the last election and although she is not the senator of my state, she stood out to me. I think she is an eloquent and educated woman who is a great role model for young girls who want to go into public service one day. I don’t claim to say that I know all her political stances; I am praising her based on what I have seen and heard of her in the media so far. She seems to be a passionate and a caring person, and she’s never been involved in any scandals, which is a huge deal in our current political climate.  I am not the only one who thinks this because almost all her (recent) statements and videos are met with enthusiasm by the American public.  So, when the Senate met to vote on the appointment of a new Attorney General of the United States and Ms. Warren was stopped from reading Coretta Scott King’s letter, many Americans were upset. Mitch McConnell, the Republican Majority Leader, stopped her with an obscure rule that claimed that she was inciting libel.

“She was warned. She was given an explanation…Nevertheless, she persisted,” McConnell said about Warren reading the letter.’

Ms. Warren of course protested saying that she was merely reading the letter, but her argument was not considered. She had to step off from the Senate floor.  The funny thing here is that later two male senators were allowed to read the very same letter without any hindrance. Now, let me ask you, what does that behavior translate to?

In an interview, Ms. Warren said that the letter was a way to raise awareness against the nomination of Jeff Sessions because overall, there aren’t enough votes in the Senate to stop his nomination. With this in mind, I am curious as to what McConnell was hoping to achieve with his rule. In fact, his action has just served as another source of disquiet amongst the American people and greatly advertised Coretta Scott King’s, the wife of Martin Luther King, Jr, letter. Shortly after this fiasco, the hashtag, #shepersisted, began trending online with people making such comments:

*To read more on this issue, read this article by the Huffington Post.*To read Coretta Scott King’s letter, visit this document found through the Washington Post.

*The featured image was taken from SHEROES website.

One thought on ““Nevertheless, She Persisted”

  1. The funny thing here is that later two male senators were allowed to read the very same letter without any hindrance. Now, let me ask you, what does that behavior translate to?

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